MUSIC AND ARTS PROGRAMS OF AMERICA ANNOUNCES UNIQUE PARTNERSHIP WITH PRISTINE AUDIO:
DELETED M&A BESTSELLERS RE-RELEASED IN NEWLY REMASTERED VERSIONS USING THE REVOLUTIONARY ”NATURAL SOUND” XR PROCESS DEVELOPED BY
PRISTINE AUDIO

Announcing Pristine Audio Natural Sound XR: The Holy Grail for vintage recordings

Music & Arts now collaborates with internationally acclaimed sound restorer to bring back old favorites in best sound

In January 2007 Pristine Audio developed and launched Pristine Audio Natural Sound to great acclaim - at last some of the major tonal discrepancies of historic recordings could be corrected, and a much more naturalistic sound reproduction could be achieved for the first time.

Since then Pristine Audio has refined and improved the process, ironing out some of the early shortcomings. But one problem with these recordings seemed insoluble with today’s technology - the limited frequency range of all recordings prior to Decca’s famous series of Full Frequency Range Recordings, launched in 1945.

Pristine Audio XR has overcome these limitations, effectively doubling the frequency range of most electrically recorded discs.

Natural Sound EXtended Range builds on the technologies behind Pristine Audio’s Natural Sound recordings to dig deeper into the grooves of early recordings than ever before and pull out the frequencies hidden there, previously lost behind surface noise and hiss.

These lost frequencies are then restored to their natural proportions alongside those already treated by PR’s Natural Sound technique.

The results are astonishing - beyond anything you ever dreamed possible.

Following this frequency extraction and careful application of noise reduction one can, at long last, start to hear something approaching a true hi-fi sound from recordings made from the late 1920’s to the advent of tape recording.

There’s no trickery involved, no artificial regeneration of frequencies (for many this seemed the most likely way to achieve this). What you hear is straight out of the record grooves, sounds lost for decades, with a frequency range approaching that of an FM radio broadcast.

Finally the great recordings of the golden era of 78s can stand sonically alongside their modern counterparts.

This opens up a new world - both for lovers of historic recordings, and for the majority who have found them too restricted in sound quality to listen to. Although the studios and equipment of the day had other shortcomings, and there remains a degree of hiss resulting from the high level of amplification needed to bring out these lost frequencies, many of these recordings really do now approach modern standards of reproduction.

In casual listening and playback you might think they were recorded yesterday - not decades ago!

For more information visit www.pristineclassical.com

© 2006 Music & Arts Programs of America. All rights reserved.